BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW – ALICIA MCCALLA

Do you write full time, or do you have another full-time job? What is your educational background?
Yes. I’m a full-time writer. Until recently, I worked full-time as a School Media Specialist or School Librarian. I have a Master’s Degree in Library Service from Clark Atlanta University.
What genre(s) do you write in, is there a favorite and which do you feel have had the most important impact on the black community? Traditionally, in mainstream media, blacks have been vastly marginalized in Speculative Fiction and fiction in general, how do you see that changing and what impact will your work have on making those changes?
I write Science Fiction and Fantasy stories with black women protagonists. My goal is to continue to write my diverse stories and encourage readers to expand their scope and horizon. These stories offer the opportunity to dream, fosters creativity, and the ability to “see” oneself in a futuristic world. It’s imperative that African Americans take up this challenge and dream broader and bigger. In fact, it’s equally important for all others to see us in expanded roles, as well.
Who are some of the major writing influences who most inspired you?
My favorites are Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Patricia Briggs, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and Sarah J Maas.
Do you listen to music when you’re creating? If so, what type?
Yes. My music is very boring. Lots of brain-based sounds that keep me in the creative zone.
How long does it usually take you to complete work on a book?
Lately, a lot longer. For many years, I was a discovery writer or a “pantser.” This allowed me to write a novel in a month but it took 6-months to iron it all out. As a full-time writer, I’m taking workshops and classes to teach me how to plot. So About a month to plot and 2-months to write. I’m sure as I get better at plotting, I can get back to writing my novels in 1-2 months.
What does your writing schedule look like and how many hours a day do you write?
I work on current WIP for 5-6 hours per day. I use Pomodoro method (40 minutes work and 15 minutes break). Very helpful.
As a black author, do you feel a personal responsibility to the black community to create content which not only entertains, but also uplifts and educates?
Books, TV, Movies have changed substantially over the years.  In some cases, there is no longer a positive message to the audience. It’s quite disconcerting and frustrating.  Just looking at recent TV series where audiences were “let down” because it was all about “entertaining” and not about “uplifting” or even answer the basic questions of “why is this important” and “what message do you have to share with me about life” is critical. All creatives have a responsibility to not only entertain but to share a message of survival, especially in the Black community.  I do feel a personal responsibility. Hopefully, others will come around and return to good storytelling.
What type of research do you conduct and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?
There are so many different types of ways to research when writing a book.  I generally like to get an idea of what the market is about by reading 10-40 novels in the niche that I’d like to write. Then, I go to Amazon and read the reviews of the top selling books to see what readers want in the niche. This is very enlightening and eye-opening. I usually take notes on the tropes/conventions to get an idea of what this niche is all about. After I have that scaffold, then I start to think about my theme/armature for the type of story, I have in mind. That’s where the research tends to get more detailed and specific to my protagonist and supporting characters.
What are some of the upcoming projects you’re working on?
In 2012, I released my first novel, Breaking Free.  I sold many copies but I could never quite figure out how to finish the series. Recently, when I decided to write full-time, I knew I had to go back and finish that series. It’s the project that I’m currently working on. I’m reworking it into a Post-Apocalyptic Superhero series. I’m very exciting about this project and can’t wait for readers to see the changes in the world-building and main character, XJ Patterson.
How can the readers learn more about your work and follow your career?
If readers want to learn more about my work and get an idea, if they would like it, they can visit my website www.aliciamccalla.com and read several flash fiction stories that I have available on my blog. They can even listen to me read them on my podcast. And, of course, signing up for my newsletter will get them even more free reads and bargain books.

It took thirty years for Alicia to accept her calling as a writer of “unusual stories.” Always writing edgy tales that pushed the envelope.  She learned to hide her violent, controversial, heart-pumping, and tragically romantic stories from family and friends.

Alicia writes for both new adults and adults with her brand of multicultural superheroes, dark fantasy, paranormal, and horror. Her stories always include strong women heroines who fight back, sometimes to the death.

Alicia’s influences include Octavia Butler, LA Banks, Faith Hunter, Patricia Briggs and Laurell K Hamilton.

Alicia is an activist in the movement towards diversifying Science fiction and Fantasy (#diversityinSFF). She created the first “State of Black Science Fiction 2012″ blog tour, is an active member in the State of Black Science Fiction FaceBook group and has a ScoopIt page where she actively curates topics related to Afrofuturism, Black Science Fiction, Black Speculative fiction and Multicultural Science Fiction.

Alicia is a native Detroiter who currently resides in metro Atlanta.  Alicia recently lost her beloved son who served as a NAVY Officer.  His memory keeps her pushing forward. She currently works as a full-time writer and enjoys spending time with her husband.

She’s working on a new superhero series and looks forward to releasing the series soon. Her adult series mixes African-American women’s fiction with dark fantasy. Check out the African Elemental series.  Sign-up  on www.aliciamccalla.com for free downloads, e-updates, sneak peeks, and coupons.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW – EDEN ROYCE

My beautiful picture
When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer and what does it mean to you to be a black writer in this society?
I wanted to be a writer since I was about five years old, but I didn’t pursue it seriously until I was in my mid-thirties. For me, being a Black writer means being myself on the page. Regardless of what genre I’m writing in – Southern Gothic, fantasy, horror, or science fiction –who I am as a person – a Black Southern woman – always makes it into the story in some way.   
Do you write full time, or do you have another full-time job? What is your educational background?
I write full time now, after leaving my day job a little over five years ago. I have a B.S. in Business Administration and worked in finance most of my career.
As far as writing education, I’ve never taken writing classes, but I read voraciously and have since I was a child.
How do you best meet the challenge of juggling your day job (if applicable) and/or your family, against your writing career?
When I had a day job, I did most of my writing after work. I was never without a notebook though, so I could jot down ideas whenever they popped up. You never know when something will inspire you, so I like to be prepared. I still keep one on my nightstand.
How many books have you written?
I’ve published two collections of short stories (Spook Lights and Spook Lights II), but only one novel, a middle-grade Southern Gothic historical that will be published in early 2021. I’m hard at work on two more, though.
Who are some of the major writing influences who most inspired you?
Zora Neale Hurston, J. California Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe
Do you listen to music when you’re creating? If so, what type?
Never. I listen to sounds like crackling fireplaces, thunderstorms, or rain on a tin roof when I write.
How long does it usually take you to complete work on a book?
I’ve only completed one so far, and that started out as a collection of short stories.
Is there any particular book that you’ve written that you’re most passionate about?
Not a book, but a short story. It’s “For Southern Girls When The Zodiac Ain’t Near Enough” and it’s my love letter to Black Southerners, no matter where they may be in the world now. I’ve been lucky enough to have some readers mention that it resonates with them, and they return to read it periodically. And that means so much to me.
What legacy do you want your work to represent and resonate in the black community and the world?
I want my legacy to be one of mixing African-American and Gullah-Geechee folklore and mythology into stories that show we as Black people have a rich cultural past and a tradition of storytelling despite our traumatic history. And to let that rich cultural past inspire us to do even more now and in the future.
What are some of the upcoming projects you’re working on?
I’m working on two novels: a middle-grade Southern Gothic contemporary fantasy and a young adult horror/dark fantasy.
How can the readers learn more about your work and follow your career?
Website: http://edenroyce.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/EdenRoyce
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/edenroycebooks/  

BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW – LINDA ADDISON

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer and what does it mean to you to be a black writer in this society?
The first time I held a book in my hands in elementary school and the teacher read the story and I followed the pictures I knew I wanted to makes things like that. I didn’t know that meant being a writer until later. I also grew up lacking basics so I came to the conclusion that being an artist meant deciding to be poor and I wasn’t willing to do that, but I had to write also. I was good at math and science and that was my path to college and a career in computer science, which I retired from years ago. All along I read about writing/writers and wrote/published speculative poetry and fiction.   I was very aware of being a black writer. There were very few black speculative writers, but I couldn’t deny my imagination so I continued. As I got recognition, I was happy to represent the Other at conventions and in print. And now even happier that there are more Others (black, gay, trans, etc.) being published and publishers.
Do you write full time, or do you have another full-time job? What is your educational background?
I write full-time now, after retiring from my day job five years ago. I have a B.S. in Mathematics, later I finished the NYU program for Computer Science and worked in programming until I retired. Per writing, I never took a class just for writing but read everything I could about process, grammar and the life of writers; I still do. I’ve kept journals since 1969.
How do you best meet the challenge of juggling your day job (if applicable) and/or your family, against your writing career?
When I had a day job I would write: lunchtime, after work, when I could. Sometimes it was only for 30 minutes in a day. I would edit and outline when I was traveling back and forth to work. I didn’t hangout on weekends, but would use the time to squeeze in writing time.   This is how I came to see that even a few words a day could add up to a poem, story, book.
Do you listen to music when you’re creating? If so, what type?
I love music without words when I’m writing, like Miles Davis, Keith Jarrett and others, speculative movie sound tracks, and some local artists I’ve discovered in Arizona.
How long does it usually take you to complete work on a book?
My poetry collections have taken from two to three months to finish the first draft. Then another month or two to edit, and make sure of the order.   I can’t say for a novel since I’m finishing my first now. I’ll know more when I’ve done my second novel.

How many books have you written?

I’ve published four books of just my work (Animated Objects, Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes, Being Full of Light, Insubstantial, How To Recognize A Demon Has Become Your Friend) and three in collaboration with other writers (Dark Duet with Stephen M. Wilson; Four Elements with Charlee Jacob, Marge Simon & Rain Graves; The Place of Broken Things with Alessandro Manzetti).

As a black author, do you feel a personal responsibility to the black community to create content which not only entertains, but also uplifts and educates?

My personal responsibility is to being honest with the work that comes through me. There’s no way to completely separate my work and my being a black author, a female, my childhood and every moment of my life. Some readers have said my work uplifts and educates. I’m grateful for that, but I don’t consciously inject that into my work.

What type of research do you conduct and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

My poetry collections come out of my journals, for the most part, which I’ve been keeping since 1969. I write any bits, pieces of poetry, reactions in them. Then something will shift and I start putting together a collection. This shift often starts with a poem, sometimes another person, like Stephen M. Wilson approaching me to do a music inspired collection (Dark Duet). I will go back to my journals since the last book and pull out seeds to build on. It’s very organic and not easy to explain.

I have several novels I want to write, inspired by short stories I’ve published. I’m finishing a novel now, inspired by a story, “When We Dream Together” published in Genesis: An Anthology of Black Science Fiction (Graves Sheffield Publishing). I wrote a short outline of each chapter in three months.

What are some of the best resources you’ve found for research?

I use the internet, magazines, non-fiction books in my home/libraries, television documentaries/series, everything.

What does literary success look like to you?

There are many points that were successful events for me. I spent a lot of time submitting my work to magazines in the beginning of my career. Success is getting published for me. Every publication was meaningful and important to me.

A few of the special moments: getting an article published in Essence Magazine in 1983 was over the top amazing. I walked from news stand to news stand, looking at the issue and thinking how people I didn’t know were buying it and reading my work. Having my poem published in Asimov’s SF Magazine (May 1997) after years of being rejected was major. Then there was being the first black author to receive a HWA Bram Stoker award® 2001. I feel beyond amazing about being one of the editors (with Kinitra Brooks & PhD & Susana Morris, PhD) that put together Sycorax’s Daughters anthology, dark fiction and poetry by 33 black women, which was a HWA Bram Stoker award® 2017 finalist. Being part of introducing that many black authors to the wider horror community was exceptional, as well as, receiving the 2018 HWA Lifetime Achievement Award.

I’ve received more than I could have imagined.

Linda’s Contact Information

>Website: http://www.lindaaddisonpoet.com
>Facebook=https://www.facebook.com/linda.d.addison
>Twitter=https://twitter.com/nytebird45
>Instagram= https://www.instagram.com/nytebird45/;
>Amazon page=www.amazon.com/author/lindaaddisonpoet

BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW – BALOGUN OJETADE

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer and what does it mean to you to be a black writer in this society?
I realized I wanted to be a writer when I was five and vowed to write stories like Wild, Wild West, but with a Black protagonist.  To be a Black writer in this society is the same as being a Black man in this society—there are obstacles to overcome; there is white supremacy, covert and overt racism, and white privilege, but I continue to move forward and I write for a Black audience, although others are welcome to read my novels and watch my films.
Do you write full time, or do you have another full-time job? What is your educational background?
I write full-time.  I also own and direct a martial arts school, teach survival and preparedness classes and camps, and provide divination, counseling and other spiritual services. I attended Howard University as a Finance Major then transferred to Columbia College where I majored in film, with a concentration in screenwriting.
How do you best meet the challenge of juggling your day job (if applicable) and/or your family, against your writing career?
Since I work for myself, I set my own schedule.  I get up early and write, then drop my two youngest children at school.  Then I come home and write some more until my wife awakens and we spend time together until she leaves for her business.  I then write until I go to my martial arts school or have to meet with a client.  When the children come home, I spend some time with them and then spend time with my wife when she gets home.  Then I go to bed.  Lather, Rinse, Repeat.
What genre(s) do you write in, is there a favorite and which do you feel have had the most important impact on the black community? Traditionally, in mainstream media, blacks have been vastly marginalized in Speculative Fiction and fiction in general, how do you see that changing and what impact will your work have on making those changes?
I write science fiction, fantasy, horror, romance, comedy and action-adventure. My favorite genre to write is horror and most of my speculative fiction includes some elements of horror. I think my work in Steamfunk has had the most important impact on the Black community.  I see us creating more speculative work in film and television. That is going to be the key to getting more and more Black Speculative fiction to the masses. Starting late last year, I returned fully to my screenwriting and filmmaking roots, so I am confident my work will be seen on the big and small screens and will inspire more to create Black Speculative Fiction.
Who are some of the major writing influences who most inspired you?
Charles Saunders, Henry Dumas and Donald Goines.
Do you listen to music when you’re creating? If so, what type?
No, I do not. I listen to ASMR audios while I write—tapping and brushing sounds relax me and help me to create.
How long does it usually take you to complete work on a book?
A novel takes me about 60 days to write the first draft.
What does your writing schedule look like and how many hours a day do you write?
I write off and on from 6am until 6pm on days I don’t see clients/students for spiritual work. I write a total of eight or nine hours a day.
What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?
Listening to ASMR. I also say my dialogue out loud if no one is home.
How many books have you written?
34. Fiction and non-fiction.
As a black author, do you feel a personal responsibility to the black community to create content which not only entertains, but also uplifts and educates?
No. I just write what I enjoy. However, since I work to uplift and educate my people in everything else I do, it translates into, and is intrinsic to, my writing.
Is there any particular book that you’ve written that you’re most passionate about?
Moses: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman and the as yet unreleased Granma’s Hand.
What type of research do you conduct and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?
I conduct several months of research before I write most of my books and I conduct small research throughout the writing.
What are some of the best resources you’ve found for research?
Thesauruses, Questia and Bio-Med Central. I also speak to my teachers in Ifa back in Nigeria, to my wife, a priest of Ifa and owner of a botanica who travels to Africa every six months, to students and friends that are mathematicians, scientists, computer programmers, professional basketball players and other spheres of knowledge, so my writing is as authentic as possible.
What have you found to be the best marketing practices for your books to the black community?
Combining a topic of interest with a panel discussion and the sale of books. My programs, From the Black Panthers to the Black Panther and Reading for Warriors have been huge successes.
How important is it that black creators work together to encourage, empower and educate the black community through their work?
It is very important. Collaboration brings about creativity and work that is fun, original and creative.
What does literary success look like to you?
Being able to live comfortably just from selling books.
What legacy do you want your work to represent and resonate in the black community and the world?
I want my books, films and television work to show that African/Diasporan spirituality, martial arts, romance, heroes and villains are cool, meaningful, and make for great stories and storytelling.
What are some of the upcoming projects you’re working on?
I am working on several screenplays and a teleplay. I have completed a few screenplays that will be shopped later this year and an award-winning screenplay I co-wrote with Milton Davis that is getting a lot of attention and making buzz in the film industry.
How can the readers learn more about your work and follow your career?
You can follow my career on chroniclesofharriet.com, on Facebook (facebook.com/Afrikan.Martial.Arts) and Instagram (@balogun_ojetade).

As  a former combat veteran (MOS: 18F), Master and Technical Director of the Afrikan Martial Arts Institute and Co-Chair of the Urban Survival and Preparedness Institute, Balogun Ojetade is the author of the bestselling non-fiction books Afrikan Martial Arts: Discovering the Warrior Within, The Afrikan Warriors Bible, Surviving the Urban Apocalypse, The Urban Self Defense Manual, The Young Afrikan Warriors’ Guide to Defeating Bullies & Trolls, Never Unarmed: The Afrikan Warriors’ Guide to Improvised Weapons, Ofo Ase: 365 Daily Affirmations to Awaken the Afrikan Warrior Within, Ori: The Afrikan Warriors’ Mindset, Ogun Ye! Protecting the Afrikan Family and Community, Kori O: Protecting Afrikan Children from Violence & Sexual Abuse, and SKG: The Black Man & Woman’s Guide to Sticks, Knives and Guns.

He is one of the leading authorities on Afrofuturism and Afroretroism—film, fashion or fiction that combines African and/or African American culture with a blend of “retro” styles and futuristic technology, in order to explore the themes of tension between past and future and between the alienating and empowering effects of technology and on Creative Resistance. He writes about Afrofuturism/Afroretroism—Sword & Soul, Rococoa, Steamfunk and Dieselfunk at http://chroniclesofharriet.com/.

He is author of twenty-five novels and gamebooks – MOSES: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman (Books 1 & 2); The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman: Freedonia; Redeemer; Once Upon A Time In Afrika; Fist of Africa; A Single Link; Wrath of the Siafu; The Scythe; The Keys; Redeemer: The Cross Chronicles; Beneath the Shining Jewel; Q-T-Pies: The Savannah Swan Files (Book 0) and A Haunting in the SWATS: The Savannah Swan Files (Book 1); Siafu Saves the World; Siafu vs. The Horde; Dembo’s Ditty; The Beatdown; Initiate 16; Gunsmoke Blues; Malik: Confessions of a Black Identity Extremist; Malik: Confessions of a Black Identity Extremist 2: Enemy of the State; Granma’s Hand; Kill City and Steamfunkateers: The Steamfunk Role Playing Game and the Steamfunkateers adventure, The Haunting of the House of Crum—contributing co-editor of three anthologies: Ki: Khanga: The Anthology, Steamfunk and Dieselfunk and contributing editor of the Rococoa anthology and Black Power: The Superhero Anthology.

He is also the creator and author of the Afrofuturistic manga series, Jagunjagun Lewa (Pretty Warrior) and author/co-creator of the Ice Cold Carter photo-graphic novel series.

Finally, he is co-author of the award winning screenplay, Ngolo and co-creator of Ki Khanga: The Sword and Soul Role-Playing Game, both with author Milton Davis.

Reach him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Afrikan.Martial.Arts and on Instagram at @balogun_ojetade and @afrikanmartialarts. Find his books on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Balogun-Ojetade/e/B00AVEA7SU.

BOOK SIGNING: THAT BOOK PLACE 6TH ANNUAL AUTHOR’S FAIR

 

What’s up everyone! This weekend, I will be selling and signing my books in Madison, Indiana. The 6th Annual Author’s Fair hosted by That Book Place is the place to be. I’ve been attending since year 2 and have been selling as a published author since year 3. Despite the fact that the store is no more, the event continues on.

authors-fair-6 (1)

Click here to join the Facebook event. I will be there Saturday only.

This event has experienced growth with each passing year, with this year hopefully setting attendance records! Food vending (cash only) will be available onsite for authors and guests. Credit card payments will be accepted for author’s books, and they will be offered at a discount from regular price. The event is free to the public and with an indoors venue, despite the weather, there’s every reason to check it out.

I will be there Saturday 10 am- 6 pm only. However, the event continues through Sunday.R.J. Sullivan and I will be on the scene as co-hosts of  The Two Towers Talk Show doing short interviews with authors whenever possible.

I’ll be either at my table or chillaxin’ with the crowds, while selling and signing copies of my books: The God Killers, Codename: Knight Ranger and The God Particle Conspiracy: A Knight Ranger Novella.

So be sure to show up and take part in the fun! You can see my pics from previous years by clicking here.

Codename: Knight Ranger Official Blog Tour Master Link List

Codename Knight Ranger Official Blog Tour Banner

KNIGHT RANGER POSTER ART 2My blog tour in support of Codename: Knight Ranger launches Monday, 2 November 2015! Check out Seventh Star’s announcement here. This blog post will serve as the master list, and I’ll add live links to the each post as soon as I know they’ve gone up.

It’s going to be an exciting week and I hope you come back frequently to check it out.  I want to thank all of the book bloggers who volunteered to be a part of the fun.

The complete blog tour is as listed:

Monday, 2 November 2015
On Cloud Eight and a Half (Guest Post)

Tuesday, 3 November 2015
Author Interview with Pete Welmerink

Wednesday, 4 November 2015
Armand Rosamilia Guest Post
RJ Sullivan Top 5 Post
Book In The Bag Author Interview/Guest Post

Thursday, 5 November 2015
Darkling Delights Author Interview

Friday, 6 November 2015
Beauty in Ruins: Science vs Superstition, Military vs Monsters? (Guest Blog)
Sheila’s Blog (Guest Blog)
Bee’s Knees Reviews

Saturday, 7 November 2015

Sunday, 8 November 2015

Please check in regularly to see the list fill in, and leave a comment below as the tour progresses and to let me know what you think.

Thanks & remember TBIYTC!!!