BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW – ALICIA MCCALLA

Do you write full time, or do you have another full-time job? What is your educational background?
Yes. I’m a full-time writer. Until recently, I worked full-time as a School Media Specialist or School Librarian. I have a Master’s Degree in Library Service from Clark Atlanta University.
What genre(s) do you write in, is there a favorite and which do you feel have had the most important impact on the black community? Traditionally, in mainstream media, blacks have been vastly marginalized in Speculative Fiction and fiction in general, how do you see that changing and what impact will your work have on making those changes?
I write Science Fiction and Fantasy stories with black women protagonists. My goal is to continue to write my diverse stories and encourage readers to expand their scope and horizon. These stories offer the opportunity to dream, fosters creativity, and the ability to “see” oneself in a futuristic world. It’s imperative that African Americans take up this challenge and dream broader and bigger. In fact, it’s equally important for all others to see us in expanded roles, as well.
Who are some of the major writing influences who most inspired you?
My favorites are Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Patricia Briggs, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and Sarah J Maas.
Do you listen to music when you’re creating? If so, what type?
Yes. My music is very boring. Lots of brain-based sounds that keep me in the creative zone.
How long does it usually take you to complete work on a book?
Lately, a lot longer. For many years, I was a discovery writer or a “pantser.” This allowed me to write a novel in a month but it took 6-months to iron it all out. As a full-time writer, I’m taking workshops and classes to teach me how to plot. So About a month to plot and 2-months to write. I’m sure as I get better at plotting, I can get back to writing my novels in 1-2 months.
What does your writing schedule look like and how many hours a day do you write?
I work on current WIP for 5-6 hours per day. I use Pomodoro method (40 minutes work and 15 minutes break). Very helpful.
As a black author, do you feel a personal responsibility to the black community to create content which not only entertains, but also uplifts and educates?
Books, TV, Movies have changed substantially over the years.  In some cases, there is no longer a positive message to the audience. It’s quite disconcerting and frustrating.  Just looking at recent TV series where audiences were “let down” because it was all about “entertaining” and not about “uplifting” or even answer the basic questions of “why is this important” and “what message do you have to share with me about life” is critical. All creatives have a responsibility to not only entertain but to share a message of survival, especially in the Black community.  I do feel a personal responsibility. Hopefully, others will come around and return to good storytelling.
What type of research do you conduct and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?
There are so many different types of ways to research when writing a book.  I generally like to get an idea of what the market is about by reading 10-40 novels in the niche that I’d like to write. Then, I go to Amazon and read the reviews of the top selling books to see what readers want in the niche. This is very enlightening and eye-opening. I usually take notes on the tropes/conventions to get an idea of what this niche is all about. After I have that scaffold, then I start to think about my theme/armature for the type of story, I have in mind. That’s where the research tends to get more detailed and specific to my protagonist and supporting characters.
What are some of the upcoming projects you’re working on?
In 2012, I released my first novel, Breaking Free.  I sold many copies but I could never quite figure out how to finish the series. Recently, when I decided to write full-time, I knew I had to go back and finish that series. It’s the project that I’m currently working on. I’m reworking it into a Post-Apocalyptic Superhero series. I’m very exciting about this project and can’t wait for readers to see the changes in the world-building and main character, XJ Patterson.
How can the readers learn more about your work and follow your career?
If readers want to learn more about my work and get an idea, if they would like it, they can visit my website www.aliciamccalla.com and read several flash fiction stories that I have available on my blog. They can even listen to me read them on my podcast. And, of course, signing up for my newsletter will get them even more free reads and bargain books.

It took thirty years for Alicia to accept her calling as a writer of “unusual stories.” Always writing edgy tales that pushed the envelope.  She learned to hide her violent, controversial, heart-pumping, and tragically romantic stories from family and friends.

Alicia writes for both new adults and adults with her brand of multicultural superheroes, dark fantasy, paranormal, and horror. Her stories always include strong women heroines who fight back, sometimes to the death.

Alicia’s influences include Octavia Butler, LA Banks, Faith Hunter, Patricia Briggs and Laurell K Hamilton.

Alicia is an activist in the movement towards diversifying Science fiction and Fantasy (#diversityinSFF). She created the first “State of Black Science Fiction 2012″ blog tour, is an active member in the State of Black Science Fiction FaceBook group and has a ScoopIt page where she actively curates topics related to Afrofuturism, Black Science Fiction, Black Speculative fiction and Multicultural Science Fiction.

Alicia is a native Detroiter who currently resides in metro Atlanta.  Alicia recently lost her beloved son who served as a NAVY Officer.  His memory keeps her pushing forward. She currently works as a full-time writer and enjoys spending time with her husband.

She’s working on a new superhero series and looks forward to releasing the series soon. Her adult series mixes African-American women’s fiction with dark fantasy. Check out the African Elemental series.  Sign-up  on www.aliciamccalla.com for free downloads, e-updates, sneak peeks, and coupons.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPOTLIGHT INTERVIEW – VALJEANNE JEFFERS

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer and what does it mean to you to be a black writer in this society?
As a young girl I wrote stories and poetry. But life got in the way, and I didn’t return to writing until I was in my forties. Discovering Octavia Butler was the catalyst for my taking the journey into writing fiction. For me, being a black writer means I have two responsibilies. I have to hold up a mirror to American society, to the world, to make folks think about the problems we’re facing, and offer solutions. I am the conscience of my nation. The second one is to write a story that grips my readers and holds on tight, one that gives them everything they want, and leaves them wanting more.
Do you write full time, or do you have another full-time job? What is your educational background?
I write everyday, but I also work as a tutor/teacher. I have an MA in Psychology, which actually helps me with character development.
How do you best meet the challenge of juggling your day job (if applicable) and/or your family, against your writing career?
I’m fortunate enough to be able to set my own work hours, so I can take off if I need to attend a CON or meet a deadline.
What genre(s) do you write in, is there a favorite and which do you feel have had the most important impact on the black community? Traditionally, in mainstream media, blacks have been vastly marginalized in Speculative Fiction and fiction in general, how do you see that changing and what impact will your work have on making those changes?
I’ve written both fiction and nonfiction. I actually wrote a nonfiction book, The Story of Eve, which was never published (except as articles). But Speculative fiction (horror, fantasy, and science fiction) is my favorite genre. We stand in the midst of a Black SF/Fantasy Renaissance: black and brown folks are making huge strides in film, art, and writing. As a black female writer I am part of this movement, and writing is, in of itself, a form of political resistance.
Who are some of the major writing influences who most inspired you?
There are so many! I won’t try to list them all, but Octavia Butler, N.K. Jemison and Brandon Massey are huge influences, as well as: Tananarive Due, B. Sharise Moore, Quinton Veal, Balogun Ojetade, and Milton Davis.
Do you listen to music when you’re creating? If so, what type?
I listen to Blues, Jazz, R&B, Rock and everything in between. It just depends on what mood I’m in and what I’m writing. King Britt, for example, is my best inspiration when I’m creating a very visual and/or romantic scene.
How long does it usually take you to complete work on a book?
It varies; anywhere from a year to two years. I took two years to finish Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective III: The Case of the Vanishing Child. But, I write stories while I’m working on novels, too.
What does your writing schedule look like and how many hours a day do you write?
I don’t have a set schedule, but when I’m writing (especially if I’m in the “zone”) I may go as long as six to eight hours.
What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?
I drink too much coffee and smoke too many cigarettes!
How many books have you written?
I have written ten books. This includes: The Story of Eve, my  Immortal and Mona: Livelong series (six books), Voyage of Dreams, Colony: Ascension: An Erotic Space Opera, and The Switch II: Clockwork (includes books I and II). I also co-edited, with Quinton Veal, Scierogenous: An Anthology of Erotic Science Fiction and Fantasy, Volumes I and II.
As a black author, do you feel a personal responsibility to the black community to create content which not only entertains, but also uplifts and educates?
As I’ve said earlier, writing is a form of resistance. For black folks reading novels and stories in which they are heriones and heros is both uplifiting and empowering. As black writers, we are quintessential to this journey. No one can tell our stories the way we can. I’d like to share something I wrote several years ago, and it’s still relevant today. In the 21th century there are very still few characters like us, and out of this small pool many are post-modern “Step-and Fetchits” (stereotypes). This is why speculative fiction is so important. This genre helps us to see outside reality, to say: what if? It helps us to imagine and create spectacular, wondrous realms, step back and find the beauty and wisdom there, and then transform our own space. We need to dream, and we need our writers to help us to dream. Even if – especially if – these dreams are of fantastic, imaginary creatures and happenings. We need this because dreaming can be an escape. One should never underestimate the power of escape. Imagine a child living in squalor, and escaping into pages of a novel. Or a slave reading by lamplight and envisioning her freedom. Or a man working as a sharecropper, and at sunset telling his story with harmonica. We all need to escape, at least sometimes, into the worlds of those who dream like us, who understand us; who look like us. To paraphrase B.B. King, we need authors who get us where we live. Second of all dreaming helps us to change. If you can dream it, you can do it. You can move yourself and your corner of life forward.
Is there any particular book that you’ve written that you’re most passionate about?
I love my Immortal series, but then I also love my Mona Livelong series. I am passionate about both.
What type of research do you conduct and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?
Nonfiction research typically takes longer (for me) than fiction research. But both can take hours or even weeks. When I wrote my essay for Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia Butler, I re-read Wild Seed, took notes, and watched interviews with Ms. Butler etc. It took me around a month to finish my research.
What are some of the best resources you’ve found for research?
It varies. I use the same method I used to complete my MA, which is googling a resource, reading it and then using this resource to find other articles.
What have you found to be the best marketing practices for your books to the black community?
I have found devoted readers on facebook and twitter. But, for my community, going to SF/Fantasy Cons and  author signings works best.
How important is it that black creators work together to encourage, empower and educate the black community through their work?
Collaboration and sharing resources is very important for our community to help us grow.
What does literary success look like to you?
I’m very well known, and I am humbled and honored by this. But I would like expand my audience and reach even more people. Eventually, I’d like to become a full time writer.
What legacy do you want your work to represent and resonate in the black community and the world?
I dearly hope that my legacy will be that I am talented, humanistic author who cares about the black community and the globe, and one is who is not afraid address issues like homelessness, racism, sexism and climate change in her writing, but who can so in a beautifully written and exciting novel or story.
What are some of the upcoming projects you’re working on?
 My co-editor Quinton Veal and I are working with Director Balogun Ojetade to bring my novel The Switch II: Clockwork to the screen, and possibly Scierogenous (as a series). I’m also releasing Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective III: The Case of the Vanishing Child this year.
How can the readers learn more about your work and follow your career?
Readers can visit me: www.vjeffersandqveal.com http://tehotep.wixsite.com/scierogenous and http://tehotep.wixsite.com/immortaliiiaudiobook  

Author’s Biography

Valjeanne Jeffers is a speculative fiction writer, a graduate of Spelman College, and a member of the Horror Writers Association, and the Carolina African American Writers’ Collective. She is the author of ten books, including her Immortal and her Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective series. Valjeanne has been published in numerous anthologies including: Steamfunk!;The Ringing Ear; Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia E. Butler; Fitting In; Sycorax’s Daughters; Black Magic Women, The Bright Empire, and Blerdrotica (in press).Readers can also preview or purchase her novels at: www.vjeffersandqveal.com.

BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT #21

TODAY’S BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT IS SUMIKO SAULSON!

 

Sumiko SaulsonSumiko Saulson’s blog “Things That Go Bump In My Head” focuses on horror fiction writing and features author interviews, writing advice, short stories and editorial pieces. She is the author of three novels in the science fiction, horror and dark fantasy genres, “Solitude,” “Warmth”, and “The Moon Cried Blood”. She is also the author of a short story anthology by the same name as her blog. A published poet and writer of short stories and editorials, she was once profiled in a San Francisco Chronicle article about up-and-coming poets in the beatnik tradition. The child of African American and Russian-Jewish American parents, she is a native Californian, and was born and spent her early childhood in Los Angeles, moving to Hawaii, where she spent her teen years, at the age of 12. She has spent most of her adult life living in the San Francisco Bay Area.

 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

http://sumikosaulson.com/books/

COMICS

http://sumikosaulson.com/comics/

BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT #20

TODAY’S BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT IS SHAWNTELLE MADISON!

ShawntelleMadisonShawntelle Madison is a web developer who loves to weave words as well as code. She’d never admit it, but if asked she’d say she covets and collects source code. After losing her first summer job detasseling corn, Shawntelle performed various jobs—from fast-food clerk to grunt programmer to university webmaster. Writing eccentric characters is her most favorite job of them all. On any particular day when she’s not surgically attached to her computer, she can be found watching cheesy horror movies or the latest action-packed anime. She lives in Missouri with her husband and children.

About Me: Shawntelle is the urban fantasy author of the Coveted series featuring Natalya Stravinsky, the charmingly neurotic werewolf from South Toms River, New Jersey. The first book, COVETED, was named a Barnes and Noble Romance Pick for the month of May.

The Natalya Stravinsky trilogy will conclude with COMPELLED, which will release in May 2014. Additional series are planned in the Coveted universe.

She is also the author of the romantic horror series called Hadley Werewolves.

You can find Shawntelle on her website, Twitter, and Facebook. She has a variety of helpful author tools on her website:

http://www.shawntellemadison.com/

BE SURE TO HELP CELEBRATE BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH BY CHECKING OUT THE WORK(S) OF THIS WONDERFUL CREATOR & REMEMBER TBIYTC!!!

BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT #15

TODAY’S BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT IS LINDA ADDISON!

Linda Addison (photo attached, photo credit Brian J. Addison, my son)

Linda Addison
(photo attached, photo credit Brian J. Addison, my son)

Linda D. Addison grew up in Philadelphia and began weaving stories at an early age. She moved to New York after receiving a bachelor of science in mathematics from Carnegie-Mellon University and has published over 280 poems, stories and articles. Ms Addison is the author of “How To Recognize A Demon Has Become Your Friend” short stories and poetry collection which won her a third Bram Stoker Award(R) (Necon E-Books, 2011) and the first African-American recipient of the world renowned Bram Stoker Award(R). “Dark Duet” (Necon E-Books, 2012), a collaborative book of poetry written with Stephen M. Wilson, was a finalist for HWA Bram Stoker Awards(R).

She was published in “Four Elements”, a collection of prose and poetry published in 2013 by Bad Moon Books, which has four sections, each written by a HWA Bram Stoker winner (Linda Addison, Marge Simon, Rain Graves, and Charlee Jacob).

Ms Addison is the only author with fiction in three landmark anthologies that celebrate African-Americans speculative writers: the award-winning anthology Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction (Warner Aspect), Dark Dreams (Kensington), and Dark Thirst (Pocket Book).  Her work has made frequent appearances over the years on the honorable mention list for Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and Year’s Best Science-Fiction.

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Linda Addison Summary Bibliography

290 Total Publications (246 poems, 23 fiction, 21 non-fiction)

 BOOKS (4)

1-“How To Recognize A Demon Has Become Your Friend”

Short stories and poetry (Necon E-Books, 2011) (How) -received HWA Bram Stoker award® 2011

2-“Being Full of Light, Insubstantial”, 100 poems (Space & Time, 2007) -received HWA Bram Stoker award® 2007

3-“Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes”, poetry (Space & Time, 2001) -received HWA Bram Stoker award® 2001

4-“Animated Objects”, sf, fantasy, horror poetry & short stories (Space & Time, 1997) (AO)

 Books with others:

5-“Dark Duet” collaborative poetry collection with Stephen M. Wilson (Necon eBooks, 2012); HWA Bram Stoker finalist 2012

6-”The Four Elements” poetry/prose collection with Rain Graves, Charlee Jacob and Marge Simon (Bad Moon Books, 2013)

 POETRY (246) published in (summarized list, see Linda’s site (www.lindaddisonpoet.com for details)

-Magazines: Essence, Asimov’s SF, Star*Line, African Voices, Doorways, Abyss & Apex, Eye to the Telescope

-Anthologies: Dead Cat Bouncing, The Big Book of Necon, Dark Faith, High Stakes (2013)

FICTION (23)

1.            “Night of the Living and Dead”; Outer Darkness mag.

2.            “Little Red in the Hood” (Tomorrow magazine)

3.            “Am I Repeating Myself?” (Outer Darkness magazine)

4.            “Dust to Dust”, (Poison Apple)

5.            “Boo”, (Going Postal anthology, Space & Time)

6.            “One Night At Sheri-Too-Long’s Popcorn Bar”,(AO)

7.            “Just Passing Through”; (AO)

8.            “The Box”; (AO)

9.            “The Christmas Ghost”; Dark Matter magazine

10.          “Homecoming”; More Monsters in Memphis, collaboration with Beecher Smith

11.          “Twice, At Once, Separated”; Sheree Thomas’ Dark Matter anthology, Warner Books

12.          “Excerpts from The Unabridged Traveler’s Guide as UFOs in Galaxy A.G.2” (Scars anthology)

13.          “The Power”; Dark Dreams I (Kensington Publishing Corp)

14.          “Whispers During Still Moments”; Dark Thirst (Pocket Book)

15.          “Milez To Go”; Voices From The Other Side, Dark Dreams II (Kensington Publishing Corp)

16.   “When We Dream Together”; Genesis: An Anthology of Black Science Fiction (Graves Sheffield Publishing)

17.  ” 369 Gates of Hell”, (How)

18.   “Future, Past, Imperfect”, (How)

19    “Artificial Unintelligence”, (How)

20.   “Working Up the Corporate Ladder”, (How)

21.   “Live and Let Live”, (How); 2013 reprinted in Mothership Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond

22.   “Unrequited”, (How); reprinted in

23.   “Heart Throb”; Slices of Flesh (Dark Moon Books)

NON-FICTION (21)

1.            Nancy Kress interview, (Pirate Writings)

2.            Painfreak by G. Houarner book review, (Pirate Writings)

3.            Painfreak by G. Houarner book review, (Poison Apple)

4.            Pirates of the Universe by T. Bisson book review, (Pirate Writings)

5.            The Orange Cat Bistro by Nancy Linde book review, (Pirate Writings)

6.            Terry Bisson interview, (Pirate Writings)

7.            HWA Stoker Weekend article w/G. Houarner (Hellnotes)

8.            NECON 17 convention article (Hellnotes)

9.            The Wings of Honneamise, video review w/Brian Addison (Space & Time)

10.          Inside the Works by G.Houarner/T.Piccirilli/E.Lee review; (Pirate Writings)

11.          Barry Malzberg interview, (Pirate Writings)

12.          Going Postal review, (Pirate Writings)

13.          KeeneCon 2000 report (DarkEcho)

14.          The Cell movie review, www.feoamante.com

15.          “Never Consumed, Never Reduced” article, Jobs In Hell online

16.          History & My Writing essay, TheAngryBlackWoman blog

17.   Introduction to poetry section in book on Neil Gaiman

18.    Recognizing Demons and Angels” article, HWA newsletter, Blood & Spades column

19.   The Inner Circle, From the Trenches article for HWA Newsletter

20.    Keeping Up, From the Trenches article the HWA Newsletter

21.    How Geek Girls Will Rule the World, interview

BE SURE TO HELP CELEBRATE BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH BY CHECKING OUT THE WORK(S) OF THIS WONDERFUL WRITER & REMEMBER TBIYTC!!!

BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT #13

TODAY’S BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT IS NISI SHAWL!

Nisi Shawl

Nisi Shawl

Nisi Shawl is an American writer who when she was little, I told her middle sister Julie convoluted tales of how she was a mermaid that had come to dwell in the small midwestern town of Kalamazoo, Michigan. This odyssey involved the Saint Lawrence Seaway, several of the Great Lakes, and mysterious underground passages her schoolteacher called aquifers. Her own origin was much simpler, of course; their parents, she explained, had found her in a garbage can.

In 1971, at the age of sixteen, Nisi from Kalamazoo to Ann Arbor to attend the University of Michigan’s Residential College. She took several French courses, Oral History, Cosmology, and a poetry seminar that taught her ten weeks of nothing. Most classes took place in the dorm, and Nisi got a job in the dorm’s library. One day she was startled to notice an extremely short person walking towards me. They were less than two feet high. It took Nisi several seconds to realize that this was a child.

Anyone under a certain age had become alien to her experience. It wasn’t this isolation that led to Nisi dropping out of school. She had an abortion, became depressed and quit going to classes two weeks from finals. She failed to finish her assignments, and left the University without a degree.

Nisi moved into a house called Cosmic Plateau and lived with people who called themselves Bozoes. She paid $65 a month rent and worked part-time as a janitor, an au pair, a dorm cook, an artists’ model. Nisi wrote and performed her writings publicly, at parks and cafes and museums. She learned a lot.

I read Charnas, Russ, Delany, Colette, Wittig. I sent out a horrible story about fornicating centaurs and got a wonderfully sweet rejection letter. Then our landlady kicked all the Bozoes out of Cosmic Plateau, and I had to live by the sweat of my brow.

Nisi worked at a natural foods warehouse, sold structural steel and aluminum, sold used books, got married and joined a band.

In the midst of all of that she kept writing and got better at it.

Nisi’s first science fiction appearance was in the nude. She modelled for one of Rick Lieber’s illustrations for Bruce Sterling’s Crystal Express (the Arkham House hardcover–I’m the Dark Girl of “Telliamed”).

Her first science fiction publication was in Semiotext(e) (see the bibliography below for dates on this and the rest of her print oeuvre). Nisi shared the table of contents with William S. Burroughs, J.G. Ballard, Bruce Sterling, William Gibson and a bunch of less well-known but quite cool others. She states that she owes her part in this literary conspiracty to Crowbar, publisher of the ‘zine Popular Reality.

In 1992 NIsi attended a cyberpunk “symposium” in Detroit. Sterling, in his inimitable manner, supposed that no one in the audience had heard of Semiotext(e), let alone read it, and she was able to retort from the third row that she was in it. So NIsi got to hang out with him, and with Pat Cadigan and John Shirley, which last professional offered to read her stories! He was of the opinion that she could write. He recommended that Nisi attend the  Clarion West Writers’ Workshop, where he and Cadigan were to teach that summer.

At Clarion West she learned in six weeks what six years at the University could never have taught her.

Because of Clarion West and another writers’ program in the Puget Sound area (Cottages at Hedgebrook, a retreat on Whidbey Island), Nisi put Seattle near the top of her list when considering a move from Michigan. She’d gotten divorced, sold her house and when she asked her ancestors where she ought to live, they said this was the place.

Her apartment is one block off of the #48 bus route. King County Metro takes Nisi all the way to the beach. Grey and wild, or smooth as oil, the water is unfailingly beautiful. By ways as circuitous as those she described to her sister almost four decades ago, this mermaid has returned to the sea.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

http://www.nisishawl.com/Bibliography.html

Please visit Nisi’s website @: http://www.nisishawl.com

BE SURE TO HELP CELEBRATE BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH BY CHECKING OUT THE WORK(S) OF THIS WONDERFUL WRITER & REMEMBER TBIYTC!!!

BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT #9

TODAY’S BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH SPOTLIGHT IS CAROLE MCDONNELL!

Carole McDonnell

Carole McDonnell

Carole McDonnell holds a BA degree in Literature from SUNY Purchase and is a writer of Christian, speculative fiction, and multicultural stories. Her writings appear in various anthologies including “So Long Been Dreaming: Post-colonialism in science fiction,” edited by Nalo Hopkinson and published by Arsenal Pulp Press; “Jigsaw Nation” published by Spyre publications, and other publications. Her reviews appear in print and at various online sites. She is a columnist for several Christian and African-American magazines. She lives in New York’s Hudson Valley with her husband, two sons, and their pets. Her first novel, Wind Follower was published by Juno Books in September 2007. Her second novel, The Constant Tower, was published in June 2013

Her Published Fiction and Essays include:

— “Oreo Blues”– Essay in LIFENOTES: Personal Writings By Contemporary Black Women, edited by Patricia Bell-Scott. Published by W.W. Norton.

— “Homecoming” – Short story. Won first prize in New Mass Media’s Annual contest and was a third place winner in the annual national Contemporary Western Fiction contest.

— “Lingua Franca” – Short story. So Long Been Dreaming: Post-Colonialism in Science Fiction — Arsenal Pulp Press – October 2004.

— “Black is the color of my true love’s hair,” – Short story. Fantastic Visions III – Fantasist Enterprises – August 2005.

— “The Australians”– Essay in LIFE SPICES from Seasoned Sistahs: Writings By Mature Women of color, Published by Nubian Images Publications.

— Homecoming at the Borderlands Cafe – Short story to be published in Jigsaw Nation anthology – DNA Publications March 2006

— “The Cat Came Back” – Nudges from God anthology.

— “That Smile” – “Then an angel came along” anthology.

— Additional devotionals appear in Christian print magazines and websites.

The Gleaners — in Black Faery anthology

So Far — in Black Science Fiction Society anthology

Changeling — in Griots edited by Milton Davis and Charles Saunders

Housewarming — in When the Morning Stars Sang anthology edited by Lyn Perry

A Cry For Hire – Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, edited by Warren Lapine

Her stories are included in her short story collection, Spirit Fruit: Collected Speculative Fiction ebook – http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Fruit-Collected-Speculative-ebook/dp/B0069VMX22
FOR THIS WEEK, CAROLE HAS MADE THE SHORT STORIES FREE ON KINDLE!!!
BE SURE TO HELP CELEBRATE BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION MONTH BY CHECKING OUT THE WORK(S) OF THIS WONDERFUL WRITER & REMEMBER TBIYTC!!!