MAN OF STEEL MOVIE REVIEW

MORE THAT JUST A FRESH COAT OF PAINT ON AN ENDURING CHARACTER!

man-of-steel-logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013

Warner Bros. Pictures/Legendary Pictures/DC Entertainment

Directed by Zack Snyder

Produced by Christopher Nolan, Charles Roven, Emma Thomas & Deborah Snyder

Screenplay by David S. Goyer

Based on “Superman” created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster

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There was a great amount of anticipation and tentativeness for me as I walked into the theatre with my family to see “MAN OF STEEL.”

I was a fan of Richard Donner’s “Superman: The Movie”‘ and after the horrendous thing which was “Superman Returns,” I was leery and at the same time excited to see where DC would take the character. It is in my humble opinion that Zack Snyder and writers David S. Goyer and Chris Nolan have delivered a Superman for a new generation with “MAN OF STEEL.”

Let me first say that this depiction of Superman/Kal-El aka Clark Kent was one which I found I was most able to identify with. We see a character who embodies what it might mean to be a stranger from another world, in search of their destiny. Although the film was a bit action heavy and dialogue light, you could feel (or at least I could) the emotions of the protagonist and somewhat relate to him.

The special effects and cinematography were quite extensive and brilliantly rendered. The scenes on Krypton were very much EPIC LEVEL SCI-FI stuff. The Krypton scenes were—in my opinion—some of the greatest things depicted in the movie. This vision of Superman’s home world was I think more in line with an alien environment than just an Antarctic backdrop which was what we saw in previous Superman films. We see an alien culture where the architecture, technology, costuming, creatures and architecture were much more robust and science fiction like than any from the previous films. I applaud the filmmakers on that.

The movie score—provided by Hans Zimmer—was very different than prior films, but I think that it was necessary to break out from the all too familiar John Williams score. While I’m a fan of the original score, the tone and atmosphere of MOS needed something more updated. Zimmer gave it a feel that was epic, solemn, tranquil, and at times thunderous when it needed to be—re-invented music for a re-invented hero.

Henry Cavill as Superman

Henry Cavill as Superman

As to Henry Cavill’s portrayal of Superman/Kal-El aka Clark Kent, it would be pointless to compare it to Christopher Reeve’s turn as the iconic hero. It would be like comparing Adam West to Christian Bale…not even in the same room. That’s not to diminish Reeve’s turn as Superman, which will always be magically classic for me and countless others who grew up in awe of it. I think that in this interpretation of Superman, it is apparent from the onset that Cavill OWNS THE ROLE! He embodies every aspect of the character and takes him out of what I call, ***“The Rocky Balboa Syndrome.” ******This is where the main character gets the snot beaten out of him within an inch of his life before finding his “GLOW” and defeating the villain/opponent.

It made sense that trained warriors from an alien planet would be more versed in combat than one raised on a farm in Kansas however, in this film Superman for the most part, gives as well as he gets. This was especially refreshing in regards to future films and a proposed Justice League film.

I must also say that despite being humble and introverted, Cavill’s portrayal of Clark Kent didn’t come off as the buffoonish caricature that was Reeve’s version. This was the one thing which I hated about the original Superman films. Even George Reeve’s Clark Kent had more swagger and that was the 50’s!

This film had breathtaking action, stunning visuals, commanding performances and albeit subtle nods to both the comic books and previous films incarnations. I feel that this film marks the return of Superman to the BIG screen and opens the door for other films about DC characters—other than Batman!

Michael Shannon as General Zod

Michael Shannon as General Zod

Michael Shannon (Premium Rush, The Iceman) was perfectly cast as General Zod. He portrays Zod with the intensity and relentlessness due the character and what we’ve come to expect from this fine actor.  I found that with this incarnation of Zod (no slight to Terrance Stamp’s performance) was easily more relatable and definitely much more intimidating. Here we have a former war hero genetically engineered to live for the safety, well-being and continued survival of his race, BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY! Unlike Stamp’s version who suffered from great arrogance, a case of Napoleon syndrome and simply wanted revenge because Jor-El sent him away to the Phantom Zone for being a murderer. There is much more to Shannon’s Zod and that was VERY refreshing!

Russell Crowe as Jor El

Russell Crowe as Jor El

Russell Crowe was also perfectly cast, as he embodied a similar air of aristocracy that Brando brought to the character in the original film, but also a “Gladiator,” flavor which spoke greatly to the spirit his son Kal-El would inherit. I’m so glad that unlike Brando and Reeve, Crowe and Cavill DID NOT share the same hairstyle!

Kevin Costner as Jonathan Kent and Diane Lane as Martha Kent

Kevin Costner as Jonathan Kent and Diane Lane as Martha Kent

Kevin Costner and Diane Lane gave admirable performances and Jonathan and Martha Kent. They fit into their roles and gave us enough emotion to suspend our disbelief. Of course Costner was born to play someone’s father after, “The Bodyguard,” while after pining after Lane in, “The Outsiders,” as a kid, it was kinda hard to see her as Martha Kent, but she pulled it off in the end.

The other performances were well executed and fit the film nicely I think.

Laurence Fishburne as Perry White

Laurence Fishburne as Perry White

Lawrence Fishburne as Perry White was a decent portrayal. I didn’t get all upset that the character went from being white to black as others did. He was never anymore than a guy who yelled at his staff and smoked cigars to me. A city as BIG as Metropolis is bound to have a black person somewhere…everybody can’t be white.

 

 

 

Henry Cavill as Superman and Amy Adams as Lois Lane

Henry Cavill as Superman and Amy Adams as Lois Lane

To speak on what I think didn’t work with this film, was the casting and character development of Lois Lane. While Amy Adams is assuredly more appealing both visually and as an actress than Margot Kidder, she’s NO Teri Hatcher either. What I mean here is that Hatcher’s turn as Lois on “Lois and Clark,” was not only prettier, but she had a greater chemistry with her leading man, Dean Cain. I just didn’t feel the chemistry between Cavill and Adams. Hopefully in future films it can develop.

I also didn’t like that they failed to integrate more of the overall DC Universe into the film. They did to some extent (albeit sparingly). I understand why they were as tentative as they were about it (what if Man of Steel flops like Green Lantern), but it still would’ve been really cool to see, imo.

Another problem I had wasn’t with the film itself, but with critics of the film saying that Superman didn’t save everyone. Well re-watch the Avengers people, neither did they! Although it was more gingerly implied in The Avengers film than in Man of Steel, let’s be real here…PEOPLE DIED IN BOTH FILMS!!!

Comparing the human death toll of both films is so inherently asinine and preposterous that it should go without saying. THIS IS FICTION! None of this is real because I can assure you that had it been, you’d have seen a lot more deaths and there wouldn’t have been a damned thing Superman and The Avengers combined could have done about it!

I digress…

I THOROUGHLY ENJOYED MAN OF STEEL! I recommend it to anyone who is a fan of Superhero films, although I warn you….THIS AIN’T YO DADDY’S SUPERMAN!

I’m just sayin’….

***SPOILERS***

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If you haven’t seen the film, please don’t read any further! With franchise films such as this one, particularly Comic Book movies, I like to give my take on the sequel.

For Man of Steel II, I think that having saved the planet and acquired his place in Metropolis, Superman begins to patrol the world and safeguard humanity (particularly Metropolis).

Since LexCorp vehicles and the building itself featured prominently in the film, it stands to reason that Luthor has been observing the events in Man of Steel and is none to happy that some “Alien” is hogging the limelight and stealing away the admiration of the city.

Here is where I’d have Lex procure remnants of Kryptonian technology left behind in the battle between Superman and General Zod and his followers. He would of course use his considerable wealth to clean up the aftermath and destruction the battle caused, while playing devil’s advocate to whether Superman is a liability to the city in lieu of the vast destruction he left in his wake.

Lex holds a press conference and is interviewed by national talk show host Gordon Godfrey to speak on how Superman is a potential threat to humanity and cannot be trusted. Meanwhile, LexCorp is studying the Kryptonian tech and discover two significant finds.

1)     An artificial intelligence module (with three blinking red dots) beyond anything human scientists have ever conceived.

2)     A crystalline substance that emits an odd radiation.

Luthor reverse engineers the Kryptonian tech to create battle armor and sells watered down versions to the US Military. Special liaison Amanda Waller in particular is interested in seeing what this tech can do. She and her elite task force want to stock pile the weapons in case Superman ever goes rogue or there is another alien invasion (preparing for an alien threat from Darkseid perhaps?)

Luthor also vows publically to protect Metropolis and the rest of the world from the alien threat which is Superman. He selects the head of his private security force—John Corben—to head up a special task force to work with Metropolis Police in cracking down on the city’s crime and arming themselves against Superman.

Superman attempts to speak with Luthor and reach some sort of accord, but Luthor provokes him to use his powers against him and records the whole exchange. He then alters the footage to make it appear as though Superman attacked him and severely injured Corben. Luthor releases the footage to the news media and in particular Gordon Godfrey and soon the public sees Superman as the enemy.

Superman keeps a low profile hoping that things will blow over. Meanwhile, Luthor uses the Kryptonian tech to configure a metal endo-skeleton and the strange radioactive substance his team found as a power source to create a new body for Corben after he is lied to about how he was injured. This new body contains some level of Kryptonian DNA and gives Corben strength and endurance on par with Superman.

As a result of this new found power, Corben becomes increasingly unstable mentally and Luthor is no longer able to control him. He goes on a rampage and tries to take over the city. Superman confronts him and in the battle and during the course of the fight, Corben’s synthetic tissue is ripped away and exposes his power source.

Superman finds himself weakened by exposure to the glowing substance and is forced to retreat. The US Military arrives and using new weapons supplied by Luthor, are able to force Corben into fleeing.

Corben is on the run and Superman is dealing with the result of their confrontation. He goes back to his Fortress and attempts to piece together what happened. He soon realizes that what happened to him was the same effect he experienced when he first boarded the Kryptonian ship in Man of Steel. The substance was somehow tied to the environment regulators of the ship.

Superman approaches STAR Labs—who also procured some of the Kryptonian tech—on how to best defeat Corben. They have discovered that lead is the only substance which appears to neutralize the radiation emitted by the substance. The scientists at STAR Labs construct a lead based exo-skeleton armor (similar to the armor worn by Zod in Man of Steel) that Superman can wear during his next encounter with Corben.

Superman confronts Corben and eventually defeats him. He begins to question him about his involvement with Luthor when he self destructs. Superman takes the scraps which were Corben back to Luthor and confronts him. Luthor is dismissive and challenges him to prove his complicity in Corben’s actions. Superman cannot and is vexed.

Luthor tells Superman that together they could accomplish so much and nothing on earth could stop them. He offers for Superman to join him and Superman declines. He tells Luthor that he’ll be watching him and when he slips up he would expose him for the criminal he truly was.

Angered, Luthor tells Superman to leave unless he wants to be escorted by his private security force and have the incident leaked to the news media and a formal complaint made to the authorities.

Superman leaves.

Luthor goes down the basement of the LexCorp building and observes a large tube containing a young blonde woman cryogenically frozen. We also see the Kryptonian Artificial Intelligence with its three red dots blinking. He vows to unlock the secrets of Kryptonian technology and use it to rule the world.

This is the bare basics…of course Lois   Lane, MaKent and the Daily Planet would figure into the story.

Feel free to comment and let me know what you think! I’d also love to hear your takes on how a sequel might go. Until next time remember TBIYTC (The Best Is Yet To Come)!!!

STAR TREK FRANCHISE DISCUSSION:

To boldly go where we already boldly went before, while giving a dying franchise a shot in the arm!

Star-Trek

THIS ISN’T A REVIEW OF THE STAR TREK: INTO DARKNESS FILM!!!

I saw a special screening of Star Trek: Into Darkness, prior to its official debut and while I really enjoyed the film and got a little more than what I expected, it wasn’t new and mind-blowing, which to me means that they did it right.  The following is MY OPINION on what this reboot for Star Trek is and what it means for the franchise. This explores why I think director JJ Abrams has done a GOOD job with the franchise reboot and why the different direction/changes were necessary in my opinion. While this is an opinion piece and open to comments, let’s keep any disagreements civil and courteous, with the idea that I’m in no way trying to convert you to my way of thinking/opinion. That said, fellow Trekkies please refrain from tossing bottles and rotten tomatoes at me during a convention/conference or other such public event!

Quite a few Star Trek fans affectionately known as Trekkies (some of which I happen to KNOW and LOVE) were up in arms when JJ Abrams was tapped to direct the Star Trek reboot/reimaging. I have to admit, I was skeptical myself and I consider myself to be a more open minded Trekkie than most of my brethren. That said, if you look at box office receipts alone, the first film was VERY successful. This and the fact that it is an established franchise is the reason we have the sequel out in theaters right now.

Recently, I had an online discussion with some of my friends and fellow Trekkies about ST:Into Darkness and they weren’t impressed. Of course, some of them weren’t impressed with the first film in the reboot and neither they or I expected any different result. Besides the complaints of obvious plot holes (it’s not like any of the other Star Trek TV series and/or movies had them, lol!), there was the lack of respect they felt was given to the source material. This is the meat of this special, Star Trek Franchise Discussion!

It is my opinion (and therefore not law or any attempt on my part to sway you to my line of thinking) that while I’m a fan of Star Trek, I think that it was only really thought provoking sci-fi when and because the content was relative to the period in which it was spawned. (This is my personal opinion, so again don’t throw bottles and/or rotten tomatoes! =D). The core idea behind the TV show was Wagon Trail to the stars…most of today’s audience doesn’t even get that reference. The franchise had to reset and reinvent on some level just to be relevant to today’s audience (outside of Trekkies). Honestly, (again in my opinion) JJ Abrams has done just that. If he hadn’t, it would have been the same stories told the same way and I personally didn’t want that.

The Space Age is said to have officially began in 1957 with Sputnik, which was nine years prior to the debut of Star Trek: TOS. Something must be said in regard to the leap in sci-fi fanfare during this time as man was coming into an age of real life space exploration and this show was the inspiration for much of the fascination with space exploration and modern technology we take for granted today. ST:TOS was cutting edge for its time with wireless handheld communicators, wireless headpieces, pneumatic doors, portable computers, artificial intelligence, two way communication screens, needle-less injections and portable medical scanners. Guess what? We have all of those things as a reality today. Back then, our reality was Science Fiction and we’ve come a long way indeed. So, how do we take things that seemed so cool and FAR OUT (I know I’m dating myself) and make them new and fresh and hip to today’s audience?

I think JJ Abrams had no choice but to do things the way he did to make the concept and the imagery relevant to today’s audience, much to the chagrin of diehard Trekkies. There’s a reason that the deck of the Enterprise looks like the inside of an Apple store as opposed to how it looked on the show…relatability! Today’s generation knows what the Apple store looks like inside and they get excited by being there, a replica of the ST:TOS set…not so much. Abrams had to make the set look inviting to a new generation, while achieving a similar configuration to the original set. I would think this would be a VERY difficult undertaking to say the least (and for those whining about it, can you do any better?).

Another aspect of the lost of relevance ST:TOS is the idea of an international community. Most people 40 and over can remember a time when the world wasn’t at your fingertips and news from the other side of the world came in days, if not weeks, as opposed to seconds. Gene Roddenberry envisioned Star Trek as “Wagon Trail to the stars,” essentially a space western (is it any wonder Captain Kirk has such a cowboy-esque attitude?). He also addressed issues such as The Cold War and the Civil Rights Movement. It was very socially conscious to have a Russian and an African American (a woman no less) as main characters in the show, not to mention giving television its first interracial kiss! The show gave the world a glimpse of a world where we had moved beyond the constraints of race, creed, color, religion and even species, in an effort to be equally accepted. These were VERY hot bed issues of the time…not so much today (although, we still have a VERY LONG WAY TO GO!).

I say all of this to make the point that Abrams had to find a way to take a sci-fi franchise, steeped in past social and historical issues/relevance and relate that to a generation that had never experienced (even a little bit), what was very much a part of everyday life back then. Let’s be real, today’s kids (anyone 30 or younger) have not lived, breathed and otherwise experienced many of the struggles society had with the themes ST:TOS explored at that time. Ask them about the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement or laws against interracial dating/marriage and you’ll likely get a blank stare as this is VERY common today.

The Star Trek franchise made another attempt in the late 90’s to revitalize itself and try to capture the spirit of ST:TOS, when they introduced a TV show called Enterprise. The show depicted the early days of Starfleet (pre Kirk) and while it resonated with some, it’s reception overall was lackluster compared to the series and movies that proceeded it. There is a reason (imho) that Enterprise failed to capture the audiences beyond a handful of seasons and was never revisited, and chief among them was it’s relatability to the audience/generation. That group of folks had grown up with Star Trek:The Next Generation as their (in some cases only) exposure to the Star Trek franchise and to quite a few of them, Enterprise was boring.

We also have to take into consideration that ST:TNG was best able to capture the audience with social issues of the time and cool technology (that had not yet been produced for public consumption). ST:TNG had holodecks, badge communicators, voice recognition software for computers, touch screen computer consoles and tablet PC’s. Kids today have all of those things now…it’s not anything to be excited about anymore and definitely not so cool and wonderful as it was in the mid 1980’s. Another thing about ST:TNG was that it didn’t have to try to establish preceding mythos of the franchise, it jumped right into the fray and won the admiration of Geekdom by providing a setting in the future , more advanced tech/weaponry, new species and special effects on par with anything the Star Trek movies ever produced.

The above opinions all work to illustrate the following: How could Hollywood take ST:TOS (a sci-fi franchise that had been struggling for years to crossover and reach larger audiences in the theaters), make it more mainstream and reach a newer, broader audience? They had to reinvent the wheel and that is a VERY difficult thing to do and impossible to please everyone in the process. I think that this is something the diehard Trekkies should take into consideration a bit more (or get their ideas at doing it better out to Hollywood). In my opinion it all boils down to taking the canon of a TV show made in the 1960’s which addressed the social and historical issues of that era, featuring technology that (about half of) is common in today’s world and making it resonate with today’s generation. A different direction had to be taken, love it or hate it, Abrams did that. He didn’t make a perfect movie(s), nor did he necessarily capture the charm and sense of wonder that ST:TOS had (although in my opinion that’s impossible), but what he did do is make films that introduced beloved characters to a new audience, took elements of the franchise and wove them into something new and relatable to said new audience. An effort which I personally salute!

In regards to the underwhelming box office numbers for the latest foray into the Star Trek franchise, I think it has far less to do with disgruntled fans of the genre and franchise, than it has to do with BOX OFFICE COMPETITION!!! With Iron Man 3(already a billion dollar franchise) having been recently released, and The Great Gatsby still at the box office, it’s no wonder (at least to me) that Star Trek didn’t earn as much as the studio had hoped. But, in all honesty, earning only 25 million short of what they wanted to see, against Iron Man 3 (a movie that had made a billion dollars already by the time Star Trek came out) was VERY impressive and respectable, imho.

In conclusion, I think that the Star Trek franchise accomplished its mission in that it:

A)Rejuvenated a beloved (but dying) sci-fi franchise while utilizing enough source material so that it wasn’t entirely foreign.

B)Reached a new audience with the summer blockbuster feel, and

C)Received enough box office receipts to be monetarily successful and competitive.

Was it a hit with everyone? Obviously not, but it did get everyone to take notice and whether you are with the new program or lamenting about the days of old, you’re doing exactly what the folks at Paramount are wanting you to do…TAKING NOTICE!

STAR TREK: INTO DARKNESS FILM REVIEW COMING SOON!!!

WRITERS WORKSHOP OF SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY

My publisher, Seventh Star Press is proud to announce that Writers Workshop of Science Fiction & Fantasy,  an incredible book by editor Michael Knost, is now available in eBook format, with print availability in trade paperback due on Wednesday. This release features contributions from a sensational list of writers such as Neil Gaiman, Orson Scott Card, Kevin J. Anderson, Ursula K. Le Guin, Harry Turtledove, Joe Haldeman, and many other top names in genre fiction, Writers Workshop of Science Fiction & Fantasy is a highly valuable contribution to the speculative fiction community developed by Bram Stoker Award-winning editor Michael Knost.

Final-WW_cover-WebWriters Workshop of Science Fiction & Fantasy is a collection of essays and interviews by and with many of the movers-and-shakers in the industry. Each contributor covers the specific element of craft he or she excels in. Expect to find varying perspectives and viewpoints, which is why the reader will find many find differing opinions on any particular subject. It is a book with something to offer all levels of writers, from those seeking to get published for the first time to others who have numerous releases to their credit.

This edition also features several original illustrations from award-winning artists Matthew Perry and Bonnie Wasson. In addition to their own illustrations, a special collaborative piece created by the two artists is featured in the book.

Available by mid-week in trade paperback format, Writers Workshop of Science Fiction & Fantasy is now available in eBook format for the Kindle and Nook at the following links for just $4.99

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO LEARN MORE & GET YOUR COPY TODAY!!!

Amazon Kindle

Amazon Kindle UK

Nook

http://seventhstarpress.blogspot.com/2013/04/writers-workshop-of-science-fiction.html

THE HISTORY OF BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION WRITERS

FIRST IN A WEEKLY SERIES FOR FEBRUARY 2013!

BLACK SPECULATIVE FICTION WRITERS     In the spirit of celebrating Black History Month, I’m dedicating my weekly blog posts to honor the accomplishments of black writers with a look into their work and contributions to the writing profession. I will be tasking myself with reading the work of one black author per week and reviewing their work as a blog post. These posts are meant to be educational, insightful and inspiring. In addition, I will be writing a post exploring blacks in a particular genre. The first post in the series will focus on the history of black writers in speculative fiction!

Within the various genres of speculative fiction, blacks are an even larger group of minorities than they are as a whole within society. And while the collective of black speculative writers is small, I believe that their voices are huge and resonate within the black fan community as a growing demographic.

Of black speculative fiction writers, some of the most popular to come to mind are Octavia Butler, Steven Barnes, Tananarive Due and Charles R. Saunders. However, the roots of blacks in speculative fiction go back much farther than them.

One of the foremost U.S. black political leaders of his time was Martin Delany (1812 – 1885). In 1859, Mr. Delany published Blake, or the Huts of America as a serial in the Anglo-American Magazine. The novel dealt with an alternate history where a successful slave revolt in the Southern states led to the founding of a black country in Cuba. Unfortunately, the novel remained unfinished. Noted black speculative fiction writer, Samuel R. Delany (no relation), has described it as being about as close to a Science Fiction style alternate history novel as you can get.

Another noted early black speculative fiction writer was Charles W. Chesnutt. He wrote folkloric Hoodoo stories and published a collection called The Conjure Woman in 1899, which is the first known speculative fiction collection written by a person of color.

Most people don’t associate W.E.B. Dubois with speculative fiction however, he wrote several science fiction short stories including, The Comet which depicted a world where the only survivors of an apocalyptic event were a black man and a white woman. This marks the first post-apocalyptic fiction work where an African American appears as the subject.

By the 1920’s, African writers began publishing works of speculative fiction, which because of the social climate of the time, received very little if any attention.

In 1920, Thomas Mofolo (1876 – 1948) of South Africa published his novel, Chaka which was written in Sotho. The novel presented a magical realist account of the life of Shaka the Zulu king.

Another African novelist, Jean-Louis Njemba Medou wrote Nnanga Kon, a 1932 novel which covered the first contact between white colonialists and the Bulu people. In Cameroon, where Medou hails from, the novel became so popular it is the basis of local folklore.

In 1945, Makonnen Edalkaccaw, an Ethiopian writer, penned the story of Yayne Ababa in Amharic. It is noted as an early work of Muslim science fiction and depicts the adventures of a teenage Amahara girl who was sold into slavery.

In the years that followed, have been graced with a growth in the number of blacks writing stories and novels in speculative fiction which includes: Charles R. Saunders, Steven Barnes, Tananarive Due, Octavia Butler, Maurice Broaddus, Nisi Shawl, Brandon Massey, Zaji, Milton Davis, L.A. Banks, Balogun Ojetade, Chesya Burke, Wrath James White, Valjeanne Jeffers, N.K. Jemisin, Talitha McEachin, Paul West, Alicia McCalla, Thaddeus Atreides, Brandon Easton, Xavier Moore, Seressia Glass, Hannibal Tabu , Sheree Thomas, Nalo Hopkinson and Nnedi Okorafor to name but a few.

Despite what’s displayed on the bookshelves of large chain bookstores, there are plenty new and emerging black speculative fiction writers who are making their mark and raising the various genres to another level. I encourage fans of speculative fiction, beginning with the readers of this blog to support these writers and help to give the genres a shot in the arm and to be representative of various cultures and subcultures throughout the US and the world. Modern black speculative fiction writers now cover a wide range of genres including: Science Fiction, Steampunk, Fantasy, Urban Fantasy and Horror however, two emerging sub-genres to appear have been Sword & Soul and Steamfunk which predominately feature characters of color.

I challenge my readers to put aside a couple of hours each week and pick up a book written by a black author during Black History Month. I encourage you to start by checking out the works of the above mentioned authors, as you’d be broadening your horizons and expanding your minds, which are two components of reading I find most admirable. Trust me; you’ll be glad you did!

FRIDAY’S BLOG POST: A review of Zaji’s novel, “When We Were One.”